• Empathy: A Vestigial Organ?

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    Scope Correspondent
    He held me as an infant, small enough to fit between the crook of his elbow and the tips of his fingers, and squeezed my leg as I wailed, not shifting his position, unable to figure out that he was applying pressure directly where I had just had my vaccinations. After a middle school orchestra concert, he asked if I thought I had played well enough to deserve a cookie at the reception. I was mortified, and another child’s mother was visibly shocked. “It was a joke,” he said later in the car. “You don’t understand my humor.”
  • Looking at Ruins

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    Scope Correspondent
    As promised, my guide took me straight to the tomb of Rosie and the Jolly Green Giant. Bundled up against winter’s relentless bite, we wound our way through a wide-open cavern spotted with the deserted artifacts of previous occupants.
  • Preemies in Private Rooms May Require Extra Care

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    Scope Correspondent
    Babies born prematurely enter the world before they are fully prepared for it. Research has shown that the noisy, chaotic environment of the typical open-ward neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), in which the infants are cared for, can cause adverse effects. But a recent study shows that actions taken to amend these effects—namely, private rooms—could actually be worse for such premature babies.
  • Turbine Trauma

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    Scope Correspondent
    Wind turbines killed more than 600,000 migratory bats in the U.S. in 2012. Can we find a balance between species conservation and sustainable energy?
  • Believing Is Not Always Seeing

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    Out in the cosmos trillions of miles away looms a planet one and a half times as large as Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system. Kepler 7-b, an exoplanet circling a neighboring star, cannot be seen directly with current instruments. And yet, scientists at MIT now insist that the planet is covered with swirling clouds. How do they know?
  • The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Volcanoes

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    Scope Correspondent
    When the largest volcanic eruption in the last 70,000 years spewed giant clouds of ash and debris into the air, millions of tiny microorganisms got caught up in the blast and hitchhiked hundreds of miles to new locations, researchers have found. The first record of microbes being distributed by volcano, these diatoms can help scientists figure out the volcanic source of ancient ash deposits, which offers a new, more reliable way to unlock the mysteries of Earth’s past.

Hundreds of Pictures, One Park's History

Sam Wotipka ’14 has co-written a book on Deception Pass State Park.  Park Manager Jack Hartt and GPSW’s Sam Wotipka teamed up to write “Two Hands and a Shovel: An illustrated exploration of the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps at Deception Pass State Park.”  “I am just happy to have the pictures of the Civilian Conservation Corps basically all in one place,” Hartt said. “It really summarized a very special period of history at Deception Pass State Park. This park is our heritage, and generations are going to enjoy it.”