• MMR Vaccine Prevents Autism

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    Scope Correspondent
    By preventing Rubella, the MMR vaccine prevents congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in the fetus. CRS is characterized by permanent birth defects, including hearing loss, cataracts, heart abnormalities, diabetes, liver damage... and autism.
  • Some Bees are Busier than Others

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    Scope Correspondent
    Every worker honeybee spends her days foraging, but some are particularly committed to the task. In fact, according to a new study in Animal Behavior, twenty percent of honeybees do about fifty percent of their hive's errands. They start early, go until late, and don't take breaks. These high achievers, known as the elites, pay the price: "The harder a bee works at foraging, the sooner it will die..."
  • Losing and Finding the Historic Sproul Observatory Scope

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    Scope Correspondent
    The green telescope dome at Swarthmore College looms over prime real estate. I walked past the building, now the Alumni House, on the way to class or the dining hall every day of my freshman and senior years. “And over here is the historic Sproul observatory,” said every campus tour guide, ever, at the sight of perhaps the ultimate liberal arts signifier.
  • The Mummy Returns

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    Scope Correspondent
    On a sunny day in 2009, a crew from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo plucked a 3,000-year-old mummy from its glass case, carried it out of the museum and across the parking lot, and loaded it, coffin and all, into a tractor trailer equipped with a CT scanner and a team of eager American cardiologists. Six years later, that scan, along with data from 136 other mummies from across the globe, are helping modern man fight one of his most deadly nemeses—coronary disease.
  • New device produces "solid light," hope for big answers in quantum mechanics

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    Scope Correspondent
    One very small device may hold very big promise for answering some of the most complex questions in physics. A team led by researchers at Princeton University has developed a system that can force light into a solid state. They are hopeful that their device could lead to the discovery of new forms of light energy, and that it might pave the way toward new answers in the mysterious realm of quantum mechanics.
  • Dino-killing asteroid damaged deep-sea life with land plants

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    Scope Correspondent
    Once you go down 3,000 feet, the ocean becomes pitch black, a harsh environment for only the toughest marine creatures. At the end of the Cretaceous period, though, the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs tried to wreak havoc at this depth off the coast of Haiti with unconventional weapons: land grasses and trees.

Meet Anna Nowogrodzki

Anna spent her childhood amid the black raspberries, creeks, and cornfields of central New York. Though in seventh grade she made a future business card that read “Anna Nowogrodzki, botanist,” she always found the written word as captivating as the natural world. At Dartmouth College, she majored in being out in the woods (Environmental and Evolutionary Biology) and minored in curling up with a good book (English). At MIT, she’s investigating parasites and more.