• Starlings Need Not Apply

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    In 1890 a group of sixty European immigrants arrived in New York City on a boat. Lacking shelter, they made their home in Central Park for a time. It was tough going at first as they struggled to adapt to their strange new surroundings. New York was unlike anything they had ever experienced. Everything was different: the towering skyscrapers in all directions, the sounds, the smells, the food. They stuck with it, though, and in a few years time they managed to carve out a niche for themselves. Their offspring were even more successful, assimilating seamlessly into their parents’ newfound home. Over the course of several generations their numbers swelled and they fanned out across the country, thriving nearly everywhere they went.
  • Swamps and Soliloquies

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    In the backyard of my childhood home, there was a swamp, a mud kingdom of sorts. For hours each afternoon, we played hide-and-seek behind the ferns and skunk cabbage. Some days we crossed the wooden bridge to my parent’s garden to pick raspberries, blackberries, peaches, whatever the neighborhood kids hadn’t yet stolen. We walked through the creek that marked the border between towns, muddying our overalls.
  • Shutter Speed

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    I sat in a chair across from the hospital bed, watching each shallow breath shrug its way out, into, and out of my grandfather’s chest. The amount of time between the conclusion of one breath and the start of the next one was just long enough that my eyes constantly flicked up to the monitor to make sure his heart was still beating
  • Empathy: A Vestigial Organ?

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    He held me as an infant, small enough to fit between the crook of his elbow and the tips of his fingers, and squeezed my leg as I wailed, not shifting his position, unable to figure out that he was applying pressure directly where I had just had my vaccinations. After a middle school orchestra concert, he asked if I thought I had played well enough to deserve a cookie at the reception. I was mortified, and another child’s mother was visibly shocked. “It was a joke,” he said later in the car. “You don’t understand my humor.”
  • Looking at Ruins

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    As promised, my guide took me straight to the tomb of Rosie and the Jolly Green Giant. Bundled up against winter’s relentless bite, we wound our way through a wide-open cavern spotted with the deserted artifacts of previous occupants.
  • Preemies in Private Rooms May Require Extra Care

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    Babies born prematurely enter the world before they are fully prepared for it. Research has shown that the noisy, chaotic environment of the typical open-ward neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), in which the infants are cared for, can cause adverse effects. But a recent study shows that actions taken to amend these effects—namely, private rooms—could actually be worse for such premature babies.
  • Believing Is Not Always Seeing

    by
    Out in the cosmos trillions of miles away looms a planet one and a half times as large as Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system. Kepler 7-b, an exoplanet circling a neighboring star, cannot be seen directly with current instruments. And yet, scientists at MIT now insist that the planet is covered with swirling clouds. How do they know?

Hundreds of Pictures, One Park's History

Sam Wotipka ’14 has co-written a book on Deception Pass State Park.  Park Manager Jack Hartt and GPSW’s Sam Wotipka teamed up to write “Two Hands and a Shovel: An illustrated exploration of the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps at Deception Pass State Park.”  “I am just happy to have the pictures of the Civilian Conservation Corps basically all in one place,” Hartt said. “It really summarized a very special period of history at Deception Pass State Park. This park is our heritage, and generations are going to enjoy it.”