• We Have The Technology… But, Ladies, We Can’t Build Her

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    There should be a way for two women to have a child together. What's the holdup?
  • California Dams May Be Key to Rescuing Fish

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    If you want to save California fish, give them more water say the experts. A new study identifies dams where water flow could potentially be increased to help certain fish thrive.
  • Long Road to Drug Approval

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    Diet and exercise continue to make little headway against the obesity epidemic, which according to the CDC now affects over one-third of American adults. The recent FDA approval of Contrave adds another weapon in the fight against America’s growing waistline.
  • MMR Vaccine Prevents Autism

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    Scope Correspondent
    By preventing Rubella, the MMR vaccine prevents congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in the fetus. CRS is characterized by permanent birth defects, including hearing loss, cataracts, heart abnormalities, diabetes, liver damage... and autism.
  • Losing and Finding the Historic Sproul Observatory Scope

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    The green telescope dome at Swarthmore College looms over prime real estate. I walked past the building, now the Alumni House, on the way to class or the dining hall every day of my freshman and senior years. “And over here is the historic Sproul observatory,” said every campus tour guide, ever, at the sight of perhaps the ultimate liberal arts signifier.
  • New device produces "solid light," hope for big answers in quantum mechanics

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    One very small device may hold very big promise for answering some of the most complex questions in physics. A team led by researchers at Princeton University has developed a system that can force light into a solid state. They are hopeful that their device could lead to the discovery of new forms of light energy, and that it might pave the way toward new answers in the mysterious realm of quantum mechanics.

Meet Cara Giaimo

Cara Giaimo graduated from Amherst College with a double degree in English and Biology, a thesis that attempted to illustrate biological principles using techniques gleaned from experimental literature, and several rescue planarians.  Her professional interests include conservation and its movements, bio- and enviro-ethics, and how different cultures view nature (since we can’t know the reverse); some more leisurely ones are gender theory, electric guitars, and weird ice cream. You can find her writing at Autostraddle, Case Magazine, and the Boston Hassle, and her at cjgiaimo@mit.edu or @cjgiaimo. If you just can’t find her anywhere, she’s probably on her bike.