• Pressed Plants Yield Data on Climate Change

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    Around the turn of the 20th century, though, the curation fad was literal: people roamed fields and forests to collect plant specimens and preserve them in plant libraries called herbaria. Now those old specimens are helping scientists reconstruct how trees have responded to shifts in the climate.
  • "Fast-forward Genetics" Induces Mutations to Produce Higher-Yielding Crops

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    This month, a team of scientists announced that they had identified and combined key genetic mutations to significantly increase fruit production in tomato plants. These new mutations arose from a breeding technique called induced mutation, where seeds are sprayed with DNA-altering chemicals. It's a research endeavor so risky that some describe it as "spray and pray"--but this time, it appears to have paid off.
  • Slower Wind Speeds Spell Rapid Environmental Change

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    Winds of change are coming, and they’re bringing poised to upend entire ecosystems. Over the last 30 years, average surface wind speeds over areas in Europe, Central Asia, Eastern Asia and North America have slowed by about 10 percent. The potential effects of “global stilling” could affect land, air and aquatic systems worldwide.
  • Underwater ‘superglue’ developed from mussels and bacteria

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    Mussels, pounded by the oceans’ waves, fasten themselves to rocks as a matter of survival. Bacteria cast protein nets to hold onto surfaces for dear life. Now MIT researchers have combined the two in a clever new way, producing the best-ever underwater glue inspired by Mother Nature—and a potential replacement for today’s surgical stitches.
  • MIT Once Boasted the Strongest Magnet in the World

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    Bert Little, host of the Science Reporter TV episode “Big Magnets,” looked into the camera in 1961 and gravely promised that soon MIT “will house the strongest magnets in the world.”

Sarah Schwartz, as interviewed by Cara Giaimo

Hear an interview of Sarah Schwartz on why she took up the dubious career of Science Writing, recorded and edited by Cara Giaimo.