• Long Road to Drug Approval

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    Diet and exercise continue to make little headway against the obesity epidemic, which according to the CDC now affects over one-third of American adults. The recent FDA approval of Contrave adds another weapon in the fight against America’s growing waistline.
  • Four Things You Didn't Know About How Your Pet Chows Down

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    Pet owners rely on their furry friends for love and support, but many know very little about what their pets are fed, and with good reason. Commercial pet food labels can be tough to decipher and since pets need a different balance of proteins and nutrients than people, it’s hard to know if an animal is eating what they should. Here are four things you may not know about what your pet eats (and what it should be eating).
  • MMR Vaccine Prevents Autism

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    By preventing Rubella, the MMR vaccine prevents congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in the fetus. CRS is characterized by permanent birth defects, including hearing loss, cataracts, heart abnormalities, diabetes, liver damage... and autism.
  • Some Bees are Busier than Others

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    Every worker honeybee spends her days foraging, but some are particularly committed to the task. In fact, according to a new study in Animal Behavior, twenty percent of honeybees do about fifty percent of their hive's errands. They start early, go until late, and don't take breaks. These high achievers, known as the elites, pay the price: "The harder a bee works at foraging, the sooner it will die..."
  • Losing and Finding the Historic Sproul Observatory Scope

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    The green telescope dome at Swarthmore College looms over prime real estate. I walked past the building, now the Alumni House, on the way to class or the dining hall every day of my freshman and senior years. “And over here is the historic Sproul observatory,” said every campus tour guide, ever, at the sight of perhaps the ultimate liberal arts signifier.
  • New device produces "solid light," hope for big answers in quantum mechanics

    by
    Scope Correspondent
    One very small device may hold very big promise for answering some of the most complex questions in physics. A team led by researchers at Princeton University has developed a system that can force light into a solid state. They are hopeful that their device could lead to the discovery of new forms of light energy, and that it might pave the way toward new answers in the mysterious realm of quantum mechanics.

Meet Michael Greshko

Michael Greshko grew up in Huntersville, North Carolina, just north of Charlotte. Ever since he first sported a bowl cut—thankfully, many years ago—he’s been interested in both creating and sharing moments of wonder with others, leading him to science, writing, and performance. Michael recently graduated from Vanderbilt University with a degree in Biological Sciences and a minor in Spanish, and maintaining his schedule was perhaps the biggest wonder of all: Outside of the classroom, he split his time between working in a paleoecology lab, writing award-winning article series for the student newspaper, and performing in student-produced musicals.